Ultimate Guide to Getting Back to Where You Used To Be

We have the secret to get all your gains back. We have the means to catapult your Fran time and Grace time back to what they were years ago.

Except it doesn’t happen quickly. And it’s really not a secret. Here it is:

  • Mechanics
  • Consistency
  • Intensity

(Specifically in that order)

Mechanics refers to technique—your ability to move properly through our core movements (squats, presses, lifts, body weight movements & gymnastics holds). For us, this means moving yourself and external objects in the most efficient, effective and safe manner possible.

Consistency has a two-part application: 1) That you are consistent in performing the mechanics of the movement; and 2) That you are consistent in CrossFit workouts. Both are necessary! CrossFit workouts are very potent medicine; too much too soon and you can severely hurt yourself. Luckily, the body adapts quickly, and before you know it, you will be hitting each workout with maximum personal intensity.

Intensity, as Coach Greg Glassman, Founder and CEO of CrossFit, formally states, is the independent variable most commonly associated with the rate of return on favorable adaptation. More simply put, intensity brings about all the good results from working out. However, we also have to realize that intensity is relative to our physical and psychological tolerances. This is a process, and one that takes an indeterminate amount of time, so be patient. Elite-level athletes may be ready to ramp up their intensity in a couple of weeks, while de-conditioned athletes can take months or longer.

The goal of CrossFit is to improve your fitness for life; no one ever got in shape overnight. If you gradually exceed what you have done before, soon enough you will be doing the mainsite workouts “as prescribed.”

Chasing your old gains at the gym

All three together: Now that you understand mechanics, consistency and intensity, here’s how they all fit together under CrossFit: While many assume that safety is the main concern with proper mechanics—it is certainly the safest way to train—we can’t emphasize enough that sound technique is the most efficient and effective road to fitness. Proper movements will allow you to lift more weight, perform more repetitions faster, or both. More work in less time means higher average power (force x distance / time = power). Higher average power means higher intensity. Higher intensity means better results. Therefore, proper mechanics are the ideal supports for the bridge to fitness.

Set Smart Goals

Rather than chasing old lifts or old WOD scores, set up a goal specific to today’s workout. For example, today we did the following:

Today's workout

Set a goal of finishing every portion of the 15 air squats in each round of “Strict Cindy” unbroken with consistency and great mechanics. You can move slowly through them, but you won’t stop until all 15 are done each round. Small, smart, and attainable goals add up over time and leave you feeling accomplished and re-motivated. No need to chase someone else or one of you old scores.

“Please remember to take things slowly and scale as needed. Please have grace with all of us and one another as we navigate these new waters together. It will take some patience”

– Coach Meg

Read more at the CrossFit Journal: https://journal.crossfit.com/article/crossfit-startup-guide-part-1

Theoretical hierarchy for the development of an athlete

Way back in the 2002 publication “What Is Fitness?” CrossFit suggested a theoretical hierarchy for the development of an athlete. This hierarchy starts with nutrition and moves to metabolic conditioning, gymnastics, weightlifting, and finally, sport. Our progression largely reflects foundational dependence, skill, and, to some degree, a general theory of development.

Theoretical hierarchy for development

Nutrition is the foundation of the pyramid. The quality and constituent elements of an athlete’s diet influence metabolism and therefore the molecular foundations of muscle, bone, and the nervous system.

The second level of the pyramid relates to cardiovascular sufficiency. Without effective metabolic conditioning, an athlete will fatigue prematurely. 

Moving up the pyramid, the third level — gymnastics — focuses on an athlete’s spatial awareness and body control. Before attempting to control an external object (barbell, ball, opponent, etc.), an athlete should first possess the strength, flexibility, coordination, balance, and agility to move his or her own body through many different body positions and movement combinations with sound mechanics and confidence.

The fourth level considers the control of external objects — e.g., weightlifting and throwing. The capacities built at the metabolic conditioning and gymnastics levels can next be applied to an object beyond the confines of the athlete’s own body. 

With this foundation developed, the athlete can then safely and easily focus general physical preparedness on the specialized tasks required of specific sports. Read more at CrossFit.com.

We know you want it!

To change your life, to be healthier, happier, and more fit! We can help with that. Meet with our knowledgeable and caring staff.

We’re going to make it!

Because we put in the work.

Because we care about each other, encourage each other, and celebrate the small wins together.

Because we’ve been there before and know how it feels like to struggle. And we know how it feels to set goals and crush them.

Because even when we’re a little scared, we stay in the fight and finish what we started.

And we think you’re one of us. You can make it too! Come see us to learn more.